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Collaboration Accounts

Overview

Most NERSC login accounts are associated with specific individuals and must not be shared. Sometimes it is advantageous to have a login account which is not tied to a person but instead to the group for the purposes of shared access to batch jobs or data. Collaboration Accounts are designed to facilitate collaborative computing by allowing multiple users to use the same account. All actions performed by the collaboration account are traceable back to the individual who used the collaboration account to perform those actions via gsisshd accounting logs. PIs and PI Proxies can request a collaboration account by logging into nim and selecting "Request a Collaboration Account" under the blue "Actions" tab.

Logging Into Collaboration Accounts

To access your collaboration account on any Cori login node or on any data transfer node (DTN), use:

collabsu <collaboration account name>
<enter nersc password at the prompt>

Tip

Only your NERSC password is required for collabsu. You do not need your one-time password.

Controlling Collaboration Account Access

PIs and PI Proxies can give users in their repo access to the collaboration account by adding them in NIM to the corresponding group. Each collaboration account has a linux file group associated with it with the name c_<collaboration account>. You can add users to the corresponding group following the instructions here.

Use Cases

Collaborative Data Management

Large scale experimental and simulation data are typically read or written by multiple collaborators and are kept on disk for long periods. A problem that often arises is that the files are owned by the collaborator who did the work and if that collaborator changes roles the default unix file permissions usually are such that the files cannot be managed (deleted) by other members of the collaboration and system administrators must be contacted. While the problem can be addressed with the appropriate use of unix groups and file permissions in practice this tends to be problematic and a more seamless solution would be of great utility.

Collaborative Software Management

The issue with managing software is similar to that of managing data – different collaborators often need to work with the same files in a particular software installation and unix groups and file permissions tend to be problematic for them. The main difference between collaborative data and software management is that software is typically managed on a short-tem basis (hours/days) and smaller in size (~GBs) whereas production data is managed on a long-term basis (months/years) and much larger (~TBs to ~PBs).

Collaborative Job Management

Production level jobs are often run by a small team of collaborators. Project accounts would enable members of the team to manipulate jobs submitted by other team members as necessary.